Thursday, February 8, 2018

Postcard from the Studio



I've been working in the studio like a mad man.  I have 13 paintings heading to Volta in March and on top of finishing them I am building all the frames, you can barely see the floor most days.  But the space still manages to be the most sanctuary-like of any space in my life.  I'm so thankful for it and the fact that I have something so fulfilling to do for work.  I think after this semester I am leaving teaching for a while.  It's been good, there are things I will miss, but my plate is too full and happily I'm busy in the studio for now.  



A few of my new paintings are about making paintings and looking at paintings.   Seems like the thing I am seeing a lot and thinking about a lot so inevitably it becomes the subject.  And tulips.  There is nothing better to look at in the winter than tulips.


Thursday, January 18, 2018

Museums Shows at the Met!

Favorite moment of the Hockney Show

I went up to New York for my opening and was able to get a few hours in the Met and Met Breuer before.  There are so many strong museum shows right now.  I saw Hockney, Michelangelo, Rodin and Munch.  My eyes were bleeding by the end.  The shows were very crowded which always detracts from the looking for me.  It's amazing how some visitors seem so unaware and like they are the only one in the place.  How? I wish I could be like that.  I spend half my time watching their insane behavior.  

I wanted to look at Michelangelo's copy of Massacio's expulsion, which is one of my favorite paintings ever.  But I listened to one woman blow smoke up another woman's *** about it for so long that I could no longer stand there, she literally said nothing for 10 minutes but her mouth did not close.  Anyway, I eventually just chose a few drawings that were less popular and tried to calm down and enjoy them.  

Beyond that, Hockney was great to see in person for all the little moments that are lost in reproduction.  So many of the paintings are so big that there are all these little still lives and funny side notes within.  The work is so seemingly carefree and easy, California and pools feel like such the right subject.  I preferred the beginning half of the show much more than the end.    















Munch at the Met allowed for a much calmer environment and that made sense for the work.  It is so depressing you just want to weep.  This painting detail above of his sister's deathbed was really heartbreaking, and the color was sick and beautiful at the same time. I heard one lady say she likes the look of the paintings but can't he just paint something a little happier?  haha.  He seems to be a real master of color and value. But there was something in his brushstroke I didn't always care for.  He seems so set on expressing immediately the misery and turmoil that the brushwork can be unfelt and too fast somehow?  And the bottom edges of the compositions feel odd a lot, things cut off at weird places.  I think that was okay, it was distressing but I think that made its point.  

Anyway, a lot to see and worth the visit.  But maybe go with earplugs...








Monday, January 8, 2018

Couple Paintings at NMG Jan 2018

Fruit with Toaster Reflection, 2017, 24 x 24 inches, Oil on Panel

I've been working like crazy in the studio recently.  There is no heat except my space heater, and the water was just shut off this week so the pipes don't freeze.  I feel like the sacrifice in no ways makes my work better,  but I like being able to complain here about the things painters go through for their work haha.

These five paintings are in a group show opening Thursday Jan 11th at Nancy Margolis Gallery.  I will also have my work at Volta in march.  So hopefully the big paintings I'm fighting come to some resolution this winter...


Bouquet Among Pines, 2017, 24 x 19.5 inches, Oil on Panel

Cereal on Snowy Sill, 2017, 24 x 18 inches, Oil on Panel

Dog Park Pile Up(Snow), 2017, 32 x 24.5 inches, Oil on Panel


Woman with Flurries, 2017, 10.5 x 13.5 inches, Oil on Panel